When did you arrive in the Humble area? If it was after 1990, you missed many changes to our landscape. Yet the landscape continues to be transformed in unexpected ways. The George Bush Intercontinental Airport Houston (IAH) is one force which continues to alter the area around us.

The airport was begun in the 1960s and would be a larger facility for Houston and the surrounding communities. The property west of Lee Road which had been the home of Francis Dairy for several decades was purchased and construction of the airport began. I don’t believe that any of the local residents could foresee the intercontinental airport as it is today. Parents would take their children to a place along Lee Road where they all would spend leisurely time watching the airplanes depart and arrive at terminals A and B. Having an airport north of Houston was welcomed by most residents. We no longer had to venture through the traffic on the streets of Houston to get a flight out of town.

However, the construction of the first two terminals of IAH was just the beginning. Soon more property was secured, more terminals were built and more airlines added flights to the airport north of Houston, The George Bush Intercontinental Airport Houston appears to always be under construction and getting larger. The spot on Lee Road where residents were able to watch the airplanes take off and land was closed. In fact, the south part of Lee Road near the airport was rerouted. Travelers now have to drive east on Will Clayton Boulevard to continue their travel on Lee Road. Lee Road north of the airport is a popular, crowded two-lane roadway. I consulted my well-worn Key Map, 37th edition, which was published in 2001. The map has the section of Lee Road on the north labeled “Old Lee Road” and proposed Lee Road curves through the wooded property to the east where it joins Lee Road to the south at Will Clayton Boulevard. Thankfully, that plan has never been developed.

All of these things about the airport come to mind each time I drive west on FM 1960. As I pass Northview Baptist Church with the three crosses standing tall near the highway, I remember when the church was on the south side of the road.

Just to the east of the church was Lakeview Park, a small subdivision of ranch-style homes located on three short streets — Lakeview, Live Oak and Willow. The homes were on larger lots with space for animals and room for children to play. The homes and tall trees were a refreshing sight until the airport decided that it needed the property. Instead of homes and tall trees, we now see a dark fence and short bushes. Our landscape was changed forever.

The airport fence continues along FM 1960 to Farrell Road which is a paved two-lane road that meanders to Hardy Road. However, in the 1950s, Farrell Road was the only road in the area and was dirt and only a mile or two long. Some maps have a dump listed on the road. My sister and I were with Daddy when he visited a man who lived in one of the two houses that were among the trees along Farrell Road. Three roads intersect with FM 1960 now and they cross as they extend to I-45. Richey Road is the only one that goes to the interstate highway.

George Bush Intercontinental Airport will continue to change our landscape as it expands. Many other entities will transform their locations into new or different sites. Daily we see the trees being removed and bare land left for development. The memories of what we had will remain as we adjust to what’s new in our terrain.

Julia Nation grew up in the Humble area and taught for more than 30 years. Email comments to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Julia Nation
Author: Julia NationEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Julia Nation grew up in the Humble area and taught for more than 30 years. Email comments to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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