YOU’VE GOT A FRIEND

Dear Editor:
We are trying to get the information of everyone who helped us out at the Kingwood Division during Hurricane Harvey, whether it was donating food or bedding and cots for us to sleep. We have a list of people and businesses already, but want to make sure we have as many people on that list as possible that helped us out. If you helped, or know someone who did, could you please email me with his or her information at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Daniel VonQuintus
Kingwood

 

A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT

Dear Editor:
After reading about the deterioration of the SanJac river bed and the sentiments of one of the elected officials where he guessed at the costs of the subject project and expressed the question of funding, the issue of the drainage fee of $10-20 per month per household came to mind. Is this just another of the Houston ‘bedroom taxes’ or could this tax money ($750,000- 1,000,000 per month) be relegated to benefit those actually making the payments? This issue surely affects the quality of life here in Kingwood now and in the foreseeable future. It has been a 20-year struggle under the heavy hand of the Houston ‘power group’ for Kingwood to develop what we had before the storm; we cannot live with a repeat performance under the present terms and conditions and saddled with the specter of repeat inundating storm events.

David Prentice
via email

 

ROCK BOTTOM

Dear Editor:
Re: Profane truck captures sheriff’s attention, Have we as a civilized society sunken this low as to allow such a filthy, meaningless phrase to pass as free speech? As reported on local news yesterday, the woman driver and her husband have several young children. What kind of ‘parents’ are these? If I were to be driving with my granddaughter behind this truck, I would be aghast beyond words! The Texas ACLU and likely the national organization may consider such a phrase in public to be constitutional free speech, but that so lacks even a modicum of common decency and common sense. Such a filthy and concurrently idiotic phrase clearly meets the State of Texas definition of disorderly conduct. Sheriff Nehls should have done his sworn duty and immediately at least issued a citation to the driver without hesitation.

Robert L. Gabler
Kingwood

 

SOUNDS TO ME

Dear Editor:
Terice Richards’s 11-15-2017 piece is titled “The Mercy of God.” In other words, she (a hospital chaplain and pastoral care minister) claims that God is merciful. Well, let’s see. Consider the following TWO biblical passages. First, “If your very own brother, or your son or daughter, or the wife you love, or your closest friend secretly entices you, saying, ‘Let us go and worship other gods’ …” then kill them (Deuteronomy 13, 6:11). That statement supposedly is God speaking to us through Moses. Second, “This is what the Lord almighty says: ‘I will punish the Amalekites for what they did to Israel when they waylaid them as they came up from Egypt. Now go, attack the Amalekites and totally destroy all that belongs to them. Do not spare them; put to death men and women, children and infants, cattle and sheep, camels and donkeys.’ ” (1 Samuel 15:3). There you have 

God ordering Saul to kill men, women, children – even infants! Instead of sounding merciful, God sounds to me like a ruthless, cold-blooded killer.

Bill Bailey
Kingwood

 

“PAT BRYAN, WHO RAN AGAINST POE”

Dear Editor:
I ran against Ted Poe in 2016. I did better than anyone who ever ran against Ted Poe. But in politics, the silver medal does not amount to much. Please stop beatifying Ted Poe. He dodged Vietnam the same way W did. As a judge, he gave out unconstitutional sentences and bragged about it in self-aggrandizement to the point of holding the entire Texas judiciary up to nationwide ridicule. Also as a judge he was famous among police for the blank signed search warrants available from him. As a Congressman, he did nothing for the first 12 years. It is only within the past two years that he is taken up human trafficking and other issues that have nothing to do with his constituency. He did nothing for flood control. His personal life is rumored to be less than saintly, and possibly the real reason he is leaving Congress. Ted Poe has been a lying hypocrite, but a very convincing one in the upkeep of his public image. I ran against Ted Poe because my neighborhood got gerrymandered into his district in 2012. My neighbors and I would never have voted for him. He never represented us. Your description of him as some saintly old granddad, grand statesman of Texas is a phony cartoon of a very bad man.

Pat Bryan
via email

 

CELEBRATE LOCAL BUSINESS!

Dear Editor:
Growing up, I would earn a quarter per chore – a quarter each for washing dishes, dusting, sweeping and more. I pocketed the quarters, hopped on my bike, and rode four blocks to the main thoroughfare in my town of 1,000. I would peruse toy racks at the pharmacy and hardware store; drool over bulk candy at the grocery store and the flower shop; and peer at notepads in the glass case at the newspaper office. These locally owned businesses received all of my hard-earned quarters. At age 8, I didn’t realize I was supporting small businesses or the local economy. I also didn’t think to save my quarters for spending at a big box or department store. I only knew how handy it was to be able to shop in my community. Main street businesses are an important part of our life in rural America, and Small Business Saturday, on Nov. 25, is the perfect time to celebrate them. Show your support by making purchases, which keep locally earned dollars in your communities. In 2015, U.S. small businesses represented 99.7 percent of businesses with paid employees, according to the U.S. Small Business Administration. When we shop, eat and have fun at local establishments, we benefit our neighbors. During this holiday season, and year round, #ShopSmall. Support your community, your friends and your way of life. When local businesses succeed, we all win.

Rhea Landholm
via email

 

NO RAIN UNTIL THE FLOOD?

Dear Editor:
The preacher declared that there was no rain on Earth until the flood of Noah. Is that what scripture says? Is that what it really means? Genesis 2:5 tells us that there were no plants growing for, or because, the LORD God had not caused it to rain. It seems to me more reasonable to assume that it did rain after God commanded the earth to bring forth plants than to assume it did not rain. Verse six tells us that a mist came up from the earth and watered the ground. The preacher assumed the mist came up to water plants. It seems to me that verse six applies to the time when there were no plants but the barren surface was watered by the mist or streams (NIV). Could there have been geysers or hot springs or steam vents? The sign God gave Noah was the rainbow. It seems to be a new thing, something special. Think how many times you have seen it rain without a rainbow. If the atmosphere was changed by the flood, as some think, it may be that the pre-flood atmosphere was such that it prevented rainbows. Why bother with such an insignificant subject? Well, for one thing God has really gifted people to work on the big important stuff. However, my purpose for raising the question is to promote greater care that we do not present our ideas and assumptions as fact or infallible scripture. And that’s the way it seems to me.

M. I. Wright
via email